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CRYSTAL BALL

Crystal Ball challenges you to predict future events. Be one of the top 25 closest predictions to win great prizes and badges daily. Or take home the big “Oracle’s Cup” (currently 17,000 Rewardicals) prize for an exact prediction. Plus, earn free entries and play the optional free bonus game each day to instantly win up to 1000 Rewardicals! No purchase necessary to win.

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GRANDMASTER POKER

It’s not your Grandfather’s Poker! Put together your three best hands of Poker simultaneously, using strategic hand-to-hand moves and timely discards to win prizes, badges, t-shirts, and compete for the top spots on the international leaderboard! Unlimited FREE plays daily! No purchase necessary to win.
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UBER-PICKS

Sports fans: UP the excitement of following all your favorite sports — NFL, NBA, MLB, NCAA (football and basketball), FIFA (EU and NA), NHL, and Cricket! Pick the winning teams and maximize your score by strategically assigning “confidence points”. Win badges, Daily Crown entries, and compete for the top spots on the international leaderboard! All Uber-Picks games are FREE to enter. No purchase necessary to win.

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ZACKJACK

Zackjack, a TripleClicks exclusive, is Blackjack…with a kick! Put together winning hands to earn badges, prizes, and dominate the international leaderboard! Unlimited FREE plays daily! No purchase necessary to win.

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CARD KING

Guess if the next card will be higher or lower than the previous. The more daring you are, the more points you score. Post a top 100 score and win Daily Crown entries. Win prizes, badges, and compete for the top spots on the international leaderboard! Play FREE twice daily, and more games for as little as one TCredit. No purchase necessary to win

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BRAIN SPRINT

Correctly answer trivia questions as fast as you can. Don’t trip on your frontal lobe on your way to the finish line! Compete for prizes, badges, and the top spots on the international leaderboard! Play up to FREE 10 games daily. No purchase necessary to win.
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HIDDEN

A hidden cache of words, protected by a den of clever foxes. Guess as many words as you can before the clues run out, while keeping your eyes peeled for the rare red, silver, and albino foxes! But don’t get outfoxed! Win prizes, Daily Crown entries, achievement badges, and compete for the top spots on the international leaderboard! Play up to FREE 10 games daily. No purchase necessary to win.

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image★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ Beginner Acoustic Guitar Starter Kit (black)— $62.55 (Save 1%!)
Jam out in style with a Beginner Acoustic Guitar Starter Kit that's perfect for aspiring musicians. With an all-wood body, rosewood fretboard, steel strings, and a classical guitar shape, this guitar produces a bright sound with every strum. The set comes with everything you need to start creating beautiful music, including a pick, digital...
Jam out in style with a Beginner Acoustic Guitar Starter Kit that's perfect for aspiring musicians. With an all-wood body, rosewood fretboard, steel strings, and a classical guitar shape, this guitar produces a bright sound with every strum. The set comes with everything you need to start creating beautiful music, including a pick, digital tuner, pitch pipe, shoulder strap, an extra set of strings, and even a nylon case so you can play on the go! Makes a great gift! * 38-INCH ACOUSTIC GUITAR: Right-handed guitar delivers a full-bodied sound with its all-wood design, 19 frets, steel strings, and an attractive finish. * ULTIMATE STARTER KIT: Perfect for beginner guitarists, it includes a guitar pick, shoulder strap, pitch pipe, digital tuner, and an extra set of 6 strings. * HIGH-QUALITY SOUND: The classical guitar body and user-friendly fretboard help to create a bright sound that both beginning and experienced musicians can enjoy. * CARRYING CASE INCLUDED: Take your show on the road, as this guitar comes with a nylon carrying case that allows for easy storage and portability. * OVERALL DIMENSIONS: 38"(L) x 3.25"(W) x 14"(H) In the box: * Guitar * Case * Pitch pipe * Guitar pick * Shoulder strap * Digital tuner * Replacement strings
4.80 5
62.55 USD InStock
image★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ Customized Controller Foldable Mobile Phone Clip— $10.50 (Save 12%!)
Quickly boost your smartphone gaming to a higher, funner level with this Customized Controller Foldable Mobile Phone Cli . Featuring a perfect fit for Microsoft Xbox One/Xbox One S/Xbox One X, and Steel series Nimbus Wireless Controllers, the clip easily connects your controller and smartphone without any tools needed. The clip's telescopic...
Quickly boost your smartphone gaming to a higher, funner level with this Customized Controller Foldable Mobile Phone Cli. Featuring a perfect fit for Microsoft Xbox One/Xbox One S/Xbox One X, and Steel series Nimbus Wireless Controllers, the clip easily connects your controller and smartphone without any tools needed. The clip's telescopic design supports mobile phones with widths up to 3.5 inches and a 160-degree adjustable viewing angle. Small and foldable, this clip fits nicely in your pocket, bag, or suitcase for a better gaming experience wherever you go. Includes two free rainbow thumb grips. NOTE: Xbox wireless controller and mobile phone are not included.
3.86 7
10.5 USD InStock
image★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ 3D Smartphone Screen Magnifier— $17.98 (Save 9%!)
Save your tired eyes with the 3D Smartphone Screen Magnifier . Perfect for watching movies and reading text from your phone, the 12-inch 3D Smartphone Screen magnifies the phone screen 2 to 4 times, helping reduce discomfort, eye strain, and visual fatigue often caused by long-term focus on a small screen. Featuring a rotating folding design,...
Save your tired eyes with the 3D Smartphone Screen Magnifier. Perfect for watching movies and reading text from your phone, the 12-inch 3D Smartphone Screen magnifies the phone screen 2 to 4 times, helping reduce discomfort, eye strain, and visual fatigue often caused by long-term focus on a small screen. Featuring a rotating folding design, the magnifier works with all smartphones and super slim when folded for easy storage in a purse, suitcase, or carry-on bag. Great for indoors, camping, road trips, plane rides, and more!
3.80 10
17.99 USD InStock
image★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ RGB Color Changing Bulb/Bluetooth Speaker— $24.85 (Save 17%!)
Combine your favorite music with colorful lighting for the ultimate party atmosphere or mood setting with the RGB Color Changing Bulb/Bluetooth Speaker! This smart LED bulb comes with a built-in speaker that can be paired with most Bluetooth-enabled devices, an approximate 50,000-hour lifetime, and lighting comparable to an energy saving 60W...
Combine your favorite music with colorful lighting for the ultimate party atmosphere or mood setting with the RGB Color Changing Bulb/Bluetooth Speaker! This smart LED bulb comes with a built-in speaker that can be paired with most Bluetooth-enabled devices, an approximate 50,000-hour lifetime, and lighting comparable to an energy saving 60W incandescent bulb. Featuring a wireless control range up to 10m/33ft, the bulb also comes with dimmable RGBW technology for adjusting bulb brightness and an IR remote control that lets you choose from among 16 colors. SPECIFICATIONS: * Bluetooth version: Bluetooth 3.0 * Bluetooth configuration: A2DP * Wireless control distance: No less than 10m * Bluetooth receiver distance: About 10m * Light color: White + RGB * Power: 12W (LED + speaker) * Speaker power: 3W * Input: AC 100 - 240V 50 - 60Hz * Frequency response: 135Hz - 15KHz * Material:Plastic * Remote control: 24 keys * Holder: E27 * Output Power: 12W * Voltage (V): AC 100-240 In the box: * Colorful E27 Light Bulb * Remote Control * User Manual NOTE: Actual brand may vary
3.67 30
24.85 USD InStock
imageLCR® Left Center Right™ Dice Game - Blue Tin — $8.99 (Save 25%!)
LCR® Left Center Right™ is a fun, fast-paced dice game that you won't be able to put down! Each game includes 3 specialty marked LCR dice, 24 playing chips and instructions. Players roll the dice to determine where they pass their chips. The last player with chips is the winner and wins the center pot. For 3 or more players ages 5 to 105;...
LCR® Left Center Right™ is a fun, fast-paced dice game that you won't be able to put down! Each game includes 3 specialty marked LCR dice, 24 playing chips and instructions. Players roll the dice to determine where they pass their chips. The last player with chips is the winner and wins the center pot. For 3 or more players ages 5 to 105; hours of fun for the whole family! Comes in a blue tin for easy storage.
8.99 USD InStock
imagePortable Bluetooth 4.0 Wireless Speaker— $56.90
Get your music on the move with this Portable Bluetooth 4.0 Wireless Speaker ! Created for audiophiles, the Bluetooth Speaker provides outstanding sound quality and up to 8 hours of playback time. It's compatible with smartphones, tablets, TVs, laptops and more. Stylish and packed with power, the Portable Bluetooth 4.0 Wireless Speaker is the...
Get your music on the move with this Portable Bluetooth 4.0 Wireless Speaker! Created for audiophiles, the Bluetooth Speaker provides outstanding sound quality and up to 8 hours of playback time. It's compatible with smartphones, tablets, TVs, laptops and more. Stylish and packed with power, the Portable Bluetooth 4.0 Wireless Speaker is the perfect way to indulge in music wherever you go. Re-charging of the battery is achieved via Micro-USB (Micro-USB charging cord not included). Makes a perfect gift for the music lover! PRODUCT FEATURES: * Avnera AV3102 chip for exquisite, balanced tone * Stereo loudness up to 90 dB (A) * Compatible with Bluetooth 4.0 * 2.0 sound channel * Built-in 1500mAh large capacity battery for up to 8 hours of playback (Micro-USB charging cord not included) * Volume control and songs track function * Built-in microphone * Hands-free phone call support * Connection: Wireless * Interfaces: 3.5mm Audio, Micro USB, Microphone, TF/Micro SD Card * Color: Blue * Charging time: 2.5 Hours * Includes storage bag * Dimensions (L x W x H): 16.80 x 2.45 x 5.80 cm/6.61 x 0.96 x 2.28 inches NOTE: Actual brand may vary
56.9 USD InStock
imageMonopoly Deal Card Game— $9.99 (Save 23%!)
A cool twist on the classic property-trading game, the fast-paced Monopoly Deal Card Game is quickly becoming the favorite of family game nights everywhere! Simply be the first to collect 3 complete property sets...but beware the Debt Collectors, Forced Deals, and Deal Breakers! Build up property sets, gather piles of money and keep wheeling...
A cool twist on the classic property-trading game, the fast-paced Monopoly Deal Card Game is quickly becoming the favorite of family game nights everywhere! Simply be the first to collect 3 complete property sets...but beware the Debt Collectors, Forced Deals, and Deal Breakers! Build up property sets, gather piles of money and keep wheeling and dealing until you're the Monopoly deal winner. Fun, fast dealing...every card counts! Fun for Ages 8 and up; 2 to 5 players.
9.99 USD InStock
imageApple AirPods with Charging Case— $152.99 (Save 3%!)
More magical than ever, the Apple AirPods with Charging Case are deliver an unparalleled wireless headphone experience. Simply take them out and they’re ready to use with all your devices. Put them in your ears and they connect immediately, immersing you in rich, high-quality sound...it's that easy! After a simple one-tap setup, AirPods...
More magical than ever, the Apple AirPods with Charging Caseare deliver an unparalleled wireless headphone experience. Simply take them out and they’re ready to use with all your devices. Put them in your ears and they connect immediately, immersing you in rich, high-quality sound...it's that easy! After a simple one-tap setup, AirPods are automatically on and always connected. Using them is just as easy. They sense when they’re in your ears and pause when you take them out. AirPods work great with your iPhone, Apple Watch, iPad, or Mac and feature up to 5 hours listening time on a single charge. Need a hand? Simply say "Hey Siri" for assistance without having to reach for your iPhone. And with Announce Messages, Siri can automatically speak your incoming messages as they arrive. You can even choose which contacts you hear them from, and Siri won’t interrupt you if you’re on a call or sharing a song. PRODUCT FEATURES: * Automatically on, automatically connected * Easy setup for all your Apple devices * Quick access to Siri by saying "Hey Siri" * Double-tap to play or skip forward * New Apple H1 headphone chip delivers faster wireless connection to your devices * Charges quickly in the case * Case can be charged using the Lightning connector * Rich, high-quality audio and voice * Seamless switching between devices * Listen and talk all day with multiple charges from the Charging Case
152.99 USD InStock
imageAvegant Glyph VR Video Headset w/Retinal Imaging Technology— $166.50 (Save 1%!)
Enjoy the most advanced viewing experience for wearable displays with the Avegant Glyph VR Video Headset with Retinal Imaging Technology . Featuring +1 to -7 diopter adjustment range, the headset enables most shortsighted and farsighted people to enjoy clear images without wearing glasses. A built-in 720p HDMI display screen works up to 4 hours...
Enjoy the most advanced viewing experience for wearable displays with the Avegant Glyph VR Video Headset with Retinal Imaging Technology. Featuring +1 to -7 diopter adjustment range, the headset enables most shortsighted and farsighted people to enjoy clear images without wearing glasses. A built-in 720p HDMI display screen works up to 4 hours on a single charge and supports all HDMI output devices (including smart TV, PS4, and smartphones). Lightweight and comfortable, the headset comes with an external head strap for improved stability and lets you maintain awareness of your surroundings simply by moving your line of sight. It can also be used as headphones via audio cable. IMMERSIVE The Avegant Video Headset looks as advanced as the viewing experience it delivers. Enjoy advanced HD audio and video in a device that's intuitive and immersive, but never isolating. ADJUSTMENT Fully adjustable optics compensate for most prescriptions, meaning you can enjoy extended The HEADSET can be ADJUSTED and it will be SUITABLE for your head. COMPATIBLE A single HDMI input means you can play directly from any computer or gaming console and any tablet or smartphone with simple adapters. It's easy to watch in a whole new way. It matches with the system ANDROID 4.0 and above & system IOS 7.0 and above. PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS: DISPLAY * Resolution: 1280x720P (per eye, two million micro mirrors total) * Aspect ratio: 16:9 * Field of view: -40 degree diagonal * Video and Audio Input: Micro HDMI * 9 axis IMU for head tracking AUDIO * Frequency response: 20Hz~20kHz * Dynamic range: 95db * Audio only input: 3.5mm standard AUX BATTERY * Battery style: Li-ion, integrated * Battery capacity: 2060mAh * Working time (video): Up to 4 hours * Charging port: Micro USB In the box: * Avegant Glyph AG101 VR Headset * HDMI Cable * USB Cable * Head Strap * 4 Interchangeable Nose Pieces * Carrying Bag * Lens Cover * User Manual * Warranty Card
166.5 USD InStock
imageWiMiUS Native 1080p Home & Outdoor Projector— $268.99 (Save 2%!)
Take your movies outside or set up a cinema theater in your home with the WiMiUS Native 1080p Home & Outdoor Projector . Designed for both outdoor and indoor uses, the WiMiUS Projector provides 1920 x 1080P high definition and a screen size up to 300 inches for a truly cinematic experience. However, its 75% to 100% zoom lets you easily reduce...
Take your movies outside or set up a cinema theater in your home with the WiMiUS Native 1080p Home & Outdoor Projector. Designed for both outdoor and indoor uses, the WiMiUS Projector provides 1920 x 1080P high definition and a screen size up to 300 inches for a truly cinematic experience. However, its 75% to 100% zoom lets you easily reduce the screen size for smaller rooms. The projector features brightness up to 6500 lumens, an aspect ratio of 16:9/4:3, and 8000:1 high contrast ratio, ideal for outdoor entertainment. You'll also enjoy the vivid images and high picture quality essential for home entertainment and business presentations. PRODUCT DETAILS: Real 5W SRS Sound & Upgraded Audio Compatibility: No need to turn off the Dolby before using it! The projector supports all audio files. Built-in dual stereo speakers and SRS sound mode surrounds you in a realistic and immersive experience. Soundbar Function: Designed for listening to music without pictures. Turn off the projector light when you only want to listen to the music. (NOTE: The Soundbar function only works on USB ports. Easy To Focus: Use the keystone to adjust the lens for a rectangular projection screen, then slowly rotate the body lens slider to get the clearest picture. Long Lasting 98,000 Hrs Led Lamp Projector: Using the newest advanced 6-layer high transparency lenses, the projector emits a brighter light and over 20 years of daily use. Upgraded Ventilation System & Lower Noise: Built-in dual cooling fans allow for 5 hours of continuous watching without heating up. Compared to the other devices, the projector reduces noise by half. Supports 4K: Supports 2K/4K videos by connecting to smartphones, tablets, laptop and MacBook. It cannot support 2K/4K format videos via USB ports. Multi-media Connection Interface: This projector supports HDMIx2/USBx2/VGA/AV/Audio Out 3.5mm. Easily connect devices such as a PC, laptop, Macbook, iPhone, and Android smartphone, external speakers (3.5mm earphone port), Blu-ray/DVD player, PS3/PS4 gaming consoles, Amazon Fire TV Stick, Roku, Xbox, Chromecast, and more! In the box: WIMIUS Projector Lens Cover Remote Controller Power Cable 3 in 1 AV Cable HDMI Cable VGA Cable Cleaing Cloth User Manual
268.99 USD InStock
imageAcoustic Audio in-Wall/Ceiling Home Theater Surround 5.1 Speaker System — $237.88
The Acoustic Audio in-Wall/Ceiling Home Theater Surround 5.1 Speaker System is the ultimate entertainment package! The Acoustic Audio high definition Series HD518 5.1 in-wall/ceiling speaker system is perfectly matched and includes the following for unparalleled sound: (2) rectangular front in-wall HD speakers (2) round rear...
The Acoustic Audio in-Wall/Ceiling Home Theater Surround 5.1 Speaker System is the ultimate entertainment package! The Acoustic Audio high definition Series HD518 5.1 in-wall/ceiling speaker system is perfectly matched and includes the following for unparalleled sound: (2) rectangular front in-wall HD speakers (2) round rear in-ceiling HD speakers (1) dedicated True Center channel in-wall HD speaker and (1) 10" In-wall HD subwoofer Each speaker has been designed to provide the best sound quality. The entire system can handle a whopping 2,050 watts of power and features authentic 8" Kevlar cones, butyl rubber surrounds and titanium tweeters. Installation is easy with quick-turn mounting arms. Mount them seamlessly into any wall or ceiling, melting them into your surroundings and saving precious shelf and floor space. The white grills can be painted to match your specific decor. NOTE: This package comes with a non-amplified subwoofer, which will require an external amplifier for use.
237.88 USD InStock
imageClassical 2 LP Set SERGEI PROKOFIEV's "Love for Three Oranges"— $16.98 (Save 43%!)
THE MUSIC HERITAGE SOCIETY MHS 4027/28 LIBRETTO ENCLOSED SLEEVE IS IN GOOD CONDITION, LPS ARE IN EXCELLENT CONDITION RARE VINTAGE CLASSICAL OPERA by SERGEI PROKOFIEV's In breathing new life into the symphony, sonata, and concerto, Sergey Prokofiev emerged as one of the truly original musical voices of the twentieth century....
THE MUSIC HERITAGE SOCIETY MHS 4027/28 LIBRETTO ENCLOSED SLEEVE IS IN GOOD CONDITION, LPS ARE IN EXCELLENT CONDITION RARE VINTAGE CLASSICAL OPERA by SERGEI PROKOFIEV's In breathing new life into the symphony, sonata, and concerto, Sergey Prokofiev emerged as one of the truly original musical voices of the twentieth century. Bridging the worlds of pre-revolutionary Russia and the Stalinist Soviet Union, Prokofiev enjoyed a successful worldwide career as composer and pianist. As in the case of most other Soviet-era composers, his creative life and his music came to suffer under the duress of official Party strictures. Still, despite the detrimental personal and professional effects of such outside influences, Prokofiev continued until the end of his career to produce music marked by a singular skill, inventiveness, and élan. As an only child (his sisters had died in infancy), Prokofiev lived a comfortable, privileged life, which gave him a heightened sense of self-worth and an indifference to criticism, an attitude that would change as he matured. His mother taught him piano, and he began composing around the age of five. He eventually took piano, theory, and composition lessons from Reyngol'd Gliere, then enrolled at the St. Petersburg Conservatory when he was 13. He took theory with Lyadov, orchestration with Rimsky-Korsakov, and became lifelong friends with Nicolai Myaskovsky. After graduating, he began performing in St. Petersburg and in Moscow, then in Western Europe, all the while writing more and more music. Prokofiev's earliest renown, therefore, came as a result of both his formidable pianistic technique and the works he wrote to exploit it. He sprang onto the Russian musical scene with works like the Sarcasms, Op. 17 (1912-1914), and Visions fugitives, Op. 22 (1915-1917), and his first few piano sonatas. He also wrote orchestral works, concertos, and operas, and met with Diaghilev about producing ballets. The years immediately after the Revolution were spent in the U.S., where Prokofiev tried to follow Rachmaninov's lead and make his way as a pianist/composer. His commission for The Love for Three Oranges came from the Chicago Opera in 1919, but overall Prokofiev was disappointed by his American reception, and he returned to Europe in 1922. He married singer Lina Llubera in 1923, and the couple moved to Paris. He continued to compose on commission, meeting with mixed success from both critics and the public. He had maintained contact with the Soviet Union, even toured there in 1927. The Love for Three Oranges was part of the repertory there, and the government commissioned the music for the film Lieutenant Kijé and other pieces from him. In 1936, he decided to return to the Soviet Union with his wife and two sons. Most of his compositions from just after his return, including many for children, were written with the political atmosphere in mind. One work which wasn't, was the 1936 ballet Romeo and Juliet, which became an international success. He attempted another opera in 1939, Semyon Kotko, but was met with hostility from cultural ideologues. During World War II, Prokofiev and other artists were evacuated from Moscow. He spent the time in various places within the U.S.S.R. and produced propaganda music, but also violin sonatas, his "War Sonatas" for piano, the String Quartet No. 2, the opera War and Peace, and the ballet Cinderella. In 1948, with the resolution that criticized almost all Soviet composers, several of Prokofiev's works were banned from performance. His health declined and he became more insecure. The composer's last creative efforts were directed largely toward the production of "patriotic" and "national" works, typified by the cantata Flourish, Mighty Homeland (1947), and yet Prokofiev also continued to produce worthy if lesser-known works like the underrated ballet The Stone Flower (1943). In a rather bitter coincidence, Prokofiev died on March 5, 1953, the same day as Joseph Stalin. The Love for Three Oranges, opera, Op. 33 In 1917, with his opera The Gambler in rehearsals for a St. Petersburg production, Prokofiev, already recognized as one of the leading modernist composers in his country, was looking for a new subject for his next operatic effort. The composer found his inspiration in a magazine published by theatrical producer Vsevolod Meyerhold in 1914-16, called The Love for Three Oranges, after the comedy by Carlo Gozzi. Following his arrival in Chicago in 1918, Prokofiev attempted to interest the Chicago Opera Company in a production of The Gambler, whose staging was canceled owing to the Bolshevik Revolution. The director, Cleofonte Campanini, turned him down, but did offer to do the new opera he suggested, The Love for Three Oranges. Prokofiev, a fast worker, completed the work in October that year, and it was premiered on December 30, 1921, in Chicago. Productions in New York (1922), Cologne (1925), Berlin (1926), and Leningrad (1926) followed, each helping to advance the cause of the composer, but meeting with little actual success. Yet, by the 1940s the music in the opera became widely known, mainly because of the often-played Suite adapted from it and use of its March as the theme of a popular radio show in America called "Your FBI in Peace and War." Throughout most of the twentieth century, The Love for Three Oranges opera had achieved more performances than any other Prokofiev opera. The Love for Three Oranges begins with a prologue in which the supporters of tragedy, comedy, eccentricity and other forms of drama watch the story, not only commenting on it, but affecting the outcome of certain events. The story they watch centers on the hypochondriac Prince, who is cursed by the witch, Fata Morgana, to fall madly in love with three oranges and obsessively pursue them. There is much humor and joy in Prokofiev's score. Some see the opera as a clever, updated Offenbach-like creation, full of slapstick and silliness. It is hard to dispute this view, though Prokofiev's occasional acid and handling of the story line perhaps place the work in a somewhat different arena, where farce and fun mix menace and mayhem in a sometimes cruel way. Just as the duck gets swallowed alive by the wolf in Prokofiev's children's classic, Peter and the Wolf, characters here can die or disappear as if quite dispensable: two of the three princesses who emerge from the oranges die immediately of thirst, the third being saved by the Eccentrics who intervene to give her water. However one interprets the opera, it is generally agreed that it is masterpiece of the twentieth century stage. performed by Viktor Ribinsky, Bass Vladimir Makhov, Tenor Boris Dobrin, Baritone Lyutsia Raskovets, Mezzo-soprano Ivan Budrin, Baritone Yuri Yelnikov, Tenor Gennady Troitsky, Bass Nina Polyyakova, Soprano Nina Postavnicheva, Mezzo-soprano Georgy Abramov, Hoarse Bass Yuri Yakushev, Bass Tamara Medvedeva, Mezzo-soprano Miroslav Markov, Bass and Ivan Kartavenko, Tenor with the Chorus and Orchestra of the Moscow Radio directed by DZHEMAL DALGAT
16.99 USD LimitedAvailability
imageVintage LP "Saint-Saens Piano Concertos Philippe Entremont"— $14.99 (Save 40%!)
Item specifics: Genre: Classical Sub-Genre: PIANO Speed: 33 RPM Duration: LP Record Size: 12" LP Rates in NEAR MINT Conditon, cover shows shows minimal ware. (please see picture). COLUMBIA RECORDS - MASTERWORKS - 34512(1977) PHILIPPE ENTREMONT, PIANO L'ORCHESTRE DU CAPITOLE - DE TOULOUSE MICHEL PLASSON, CONDUCTOR....
Item specifics: Genre: Classical Sub-Genre: PIANO Speed: 33 RPM Duration: LP Record Size: 12" LP Rates in NEAR MINT Conditon, cover shows shows minimal ware. (please see picture). COLUMBIA RECORDS - MASTERWORKS - 34512(1977) PHILIPPE ENTREMONT, PIANO L'ORCHESTRE DU CAPITOLE - DE TOULOUSE MICHEL PLASSON, CONDUCTOR. PREODUCED BY ROY EMERSON - SIDE ONE: SAINT-SAENS: CONCERTO NO. 1 IN D MAJOR FOR PIANO AND ORCHSTRA OP. 17 - I ANDANTE: ALLEGRO ASSAI - II-ANDANTE SOSTENUTO QUASI ADAGIO - III - ALLEGRO CON FUOCO. SIDE TWO: SAINT-SAENS: CONCERTO NO 5 IN F MAKOR FOR PIANO AND ORCHSTRA, OP. 103 - I - ALLEGRO ANIMATO - II- ANDATE: ALLEGRETTO TRANQUILLO: ANDANTE - III- MOLTO ALLEGRO.
14.99 USD LimitedAvailability
imageVintage LP Berlioz: Nuits d'ete; La Mort de Cleopatre (Death of Cleopatra). BBC SO, Boulez conductor— $14.99 (Save 40%!)
RARE VINTAGE TWO CLASSICAL WORKS COLUMBIA MASTERWORKS STEREO M 34563 SLEEVE IS IN GOOD CONDITION - LP IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION Written by Hector Berlioz Berlioz, the passionate, ardent, irrepressible genius of French Romanticism, left a rich and original oeuvre which exerted a profound influence on nineteenth century music. Berlioz...
RARE VINTAGE TWO CLASSICAL WORKS COLUMBIA MASTERWORKS STEREO M 34563 SLEEVE IS IN GOOD CONDITION - LP IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION Written by Hector Berlioz Berlioz, the passionate, ardent, irrepressible genius of French Romanticism, left a rich and original oeuvre which exerted a profound influence on nineteenth century music. Berlioz developed a profound affinity toward music and literature as a child. Sent to Paris at 17 to study medicine, he was enchanted by Gluck's operas, firmly deciding to become a composer. With his father's reluctant consent, Berlioz entered the Paris Conservatoire in 1826. His originality was already apparent and disconcerting — a competition cantata, Cléopâtre (1829), looms as his first sustained masterpiece — and he won the Prix de Rome in 1830 amid the turmoil of the July Revolution. Meanwhile, a performance of Hamlet in September 1827, with Harriet Smithson as Ophelia, provoked an overwhelming but unrequited passion, whose aftermath may be heard in the Symphonie fantastique (1830). Absence, song for voice & orchestra, (Les Nuits d'été), H. 85 (Op. 7/4) Berlioz was a frustrated opera composer. The fiasco which overtook the Paris Opéra's premiere of Benvenuto Cellini in 1838 forced him to seek alternatives which would allow his dramatic richness of conception to be aired without actual staging. In the upshot, the loose form of a "dramatic symphony" for soloists, chorus, and orchestra, achieved in Roméo et Juliette (1839), allowed him to focus upon salient moments from Shakespeare's play, freed from the entanglements of a complex narrative. The concentration achieved thereby helped Berlioz temper his unique power, grandeur, and sheer flair with a new delicacy and refinement. The next step was taken in 1840 with the six songs of Les Nuits d'été, to poems by the arch-Romantic, Théophile Gautier, of which Absence is the most poignant — a cri de coeur whose distilled drama is all the more powerful for being implicit and allusive. Scored for piano and mezzo, this lament unfolds with a melodic eloquence in which the ache for the absent lover is palpable and breathtakingly gripping — a world of heartbreak conjured in a few telling phrases. Sung by Yvonne Minton (Mezzo-soprano) This tall, comely and aristocratic mezzo-soprano from Australia achieved fame in the 1970s, propelled by the mentoring of Georg Solti (who engaged her for several important recordings) and her cool (but inwardly passionate) and dignified presence on-stage. Yvonne Minton was also a concert artist of the first order, appearing with many of the world's ranking orchestras under leading conductors. She was perhaps the finest Octavian of her time, that role serving as her calling card in several prominent houses. She was a dignified, consoling Angel in Elgar's The Dream of Gerontius, equaled only by Janet Baker. and Stuart Burrows (Tenor) Though his voice sometimes lacked individuality, Stuart Burrows was in many ways an ideal Mozart and French lyric tenor, flexible and with a seemingly seamless technique. He was also scrupulous musician, known for saying that a role can be memorized but never fully learned, that there is always more to add and rethink. While he occasionally and carefully sang some heavier roles, such as Lensky in Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin, Alfredo in Verdi's La traviata, Gounod's Faust, and even the title role in Offenbach's The Tales of Hoffmann, he never, as many of his predecessors and successors did, forced and harmed his voice by choosing the wrong repertoire. Performed by the BBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by PIERRE BOULEZ Pierre Boulez (b. 1925), French composer, conductor, and music theorist, is regarded as a leading composer of the post-Webern serialist movement who also embraced elements of aleatory and electronics. As a child Boulez demonstrated a formidable aptitude in mathematics, but left for Paris in 1942 to enroll in the Paris Conservatoire. His studies there often ran into difficulties, as he was rapidly developing revolutionary — "Praise be to amnesia" — attitudes towards all things traditional. But two decisive influences during those years helped to shape his musical personality. The first was Messiaen's famous analysis course, the other was René Leibowitz, who introduced him to serial music, where Boulez found "a harmonic and contrapuntal richness and a capacity for development an extension of a kind I have never found anywhere else." AND La Mort de Cléopâtre, for soprano & orchestra, H.36 La Mort de Cléopâtre (The Death of Cleopatra) was Berlioz's third attempt to win the Prix de Rome from the Academie des Beaux-Arts. His first attempt in 1827 was La Mort d'Orphée, which failed to place. His second attempt in 1828 was Herminie, which took second place. Berlioz called La Mort de Cléopâtre "a lyric scene" for soprano and orchestra, setting a text by P.A. Vieillard. The vocal writing is extremely dramatic, but it ignores distinctions between recitative and aria, which infuriated the jury. The orchestral writing is lush and full, with extraordinary harmonies that likewise alienated the jury. La Mort de Cléopâtre was judged such a failure in the eyes of the Academie that it gave no first place prize that year. The following year, Berlioz won the Prix de Rome with his conservative La Mort de Sardanapale, but, having already composed his wildly experimental and incredibly wild Symphonie fantastique, he found that he no longer cared all that much about the Academie. Also sung by Yvonne Minton and performed by the BBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Pierre Boulez
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imageVintage LP Camille Saint-Saens Symphony No. 3 in C Minor, Op. 78 (— $14.99 (Save 40%!)
RARE VINTAGE LP ORGAN CONCERTOS THE MUSICAL HERITAGE SOCIETY STEREO MHS 1232 SLEEVE IS IN GOOD CONDITION - LP IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION Composed by CAMILLE SAINT-SAENS Camille Saint-Saëns was something of an anomaly among French composers of the nineteenth century in that he wrote in virtually all genres, including opera, symphonies,...
RARE VINTAGE LP ORGAN CONCERTOS THE MUSICAL HERITAGE SOCIETY STEREO MHS 1232 SLEEVE IS IN GOOD CONDITION - LP IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION Composed by CAMILLE SAINT-SAENS Camille Saint-Saëns was something of an anomaly among French composers of the nineteenth century in that he wrote in virtually all genres, including opera, symphonies, concertos, songs, sacred and secular choral music, solo piano, and chamber music. He was generally not a pioneer, though he did help to revive some earlier and largely forgotten dance forms, like the bourée and gavotte. He was a conservative who wrote many popular scores scattered throughout the various genres: the Piano Concerto No. 2, Symphony No. 3 ("Organ"), the symphonic poem Danse macabre, the opera Samson et Dalila, and probably his most widely performed work, The Carnival of The Animals. While he remained a composer closely tied to tradition and traditional forms in his later years, he did develop a more arid style, less colorful and, in the end, less appealing. He was also a poet and playwright of some distinction. Saint-Saëns was born in Paris on October 9, 1835. He was one of the most precocious musicians ever, beginning piano lessons with his aunt at two-and-a-half and composing his first work at three. At age seven he studied composition with Pierre Maledin. When he was ten, he gave a concert that included Beethoven's Third Piano Concerto, Mozart's B flat Concerto, K. 460, along with works by Bach, Handel, and Hummel. In his academic studies, he displayed the same genius, learning languages and advanced mathematics with ease and celerity. He would also develop keen, lifelong interests in geology and astronomy. In 1848, he entered the Paris Conservatory and studied organ and composition, the latter with Halévy. By his early twenties, following the composition of two symphonies, he had won the admiration and support of Berlioz, Liszt, Gounod, Rossini, and other notable figures. From 1853 to 1876, he held church organist posts; he also taught at the École Niedermeyer (1861-1865). He composed much throughout his early years, turning out the 1853 Symphony in F ("Urbs Roma"), a Mass (1855) and several concertos, including the popular second, for piano (1868). In 1875, Saint-Saëns married the 19-year-old Marie Truffot, bringing on perhaps the saddest chapter in his life. The union produced two children who died within six weeks of each other, one from a four-story fall. The marriage ended in 1881. Oddly, this dark period in his life produced some of his most popular works, including Danse macabre (1875) and Samson et Dalila (1878). After the tragic events of his marriage, Saint-Saëns developed a fondness for Fauré and his family, acting as a second father to Fauré's children. But he also remained very close to his mother, who had opposed his marriage. When she died in 1888, the composer fell into a deep depression, even contemplating suicide for a time. He did much travel in the years that followed and developed an interest in Algeria and Egypt, which eventually inspired him to write Africa (1891) and his Piano Concerto No. 5, the "Egyptian". He also turned out works unrelated to exotic places, such as his popular and most enduring serious composition, the Symphony No. 3. Curiously, after 1890, Saint-Saëns' music was regarded with some condescension in his homeland, while in England and the United States he was hailed as France's greatest living composer well into the twentieth century. Saint-Saëns experienced an especially triumphant concert tour when he visited the U.S. in 1915. In the last two decades of his life, he remained attached to his dogs and was largely a loner. He died in Algeria on December 16, 1921. selections include: SYMPHONY No. 3 in C Minor ("Organ"), Op. 78 Composition Description by John Palmer The London Philharmonic Society commissioned the Symphony No. 3 from Saint-Saëns, much as it had Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. Saint-Saëns directed the first performance in London on May 19, 1886. Although he lived until 1921, Saint-Saëns would not compose another symphony. He later explained: "With it I have given all I could give. What I did I could not achieve again." He had intended to dedicate the piece to Liszt, but the score was published after Liszt's death with the inscription, "Á la Memoire de Franz Liszt." The Symphony in C minor shows Saint-Saëns' use of thematic transformation, also present in the overture Spartacus and the Fourth Piano Concerto. This technique Saint-Saëns observed in the symphonic poems of Liszt, as well as in Berlioz's Symphonie fantastique. Following their lead, Saint-Saëns takes his principal theme through transformations throughout his Third Symphony. To the typical forces of a large orchestra he added his and Liszt's primary instruments, the organ and piano. Saint-Saëns cast the symphony in two large sections, but each of these is in two clear parts, creating a traditional four-movement work. . and OMPHALE'S SPINNING WHEEL, Op. 31 DANCE MACABRE, Symphonic Poem in G Minor, Op. 40 Composition Description by John Palmer Composed in 1874 and published in 1875, Danse macabre is the third of Saint-Saëns' four orchestral tone poems and is easily his most popular work in that medium. In his Le carnaval des animaux (The Carnival of the Animals), composed in 1886, Saint-Saëns parodies the Danse macabre, as well as works by other composers. The title of Danse macabre is usually translated as Dance of Death, but Ghoulish Dance or Dance of Grim Humor might better communicate the character of the piece. Saint-Saëns did not originally write the Danse macabre as a work for orchestra. It was first a song for voice and piano that the composer later transcribed and modified for orchestra. A few lines from the song's text will aid in understanding the symphonic poem: "Death at midnight plays a dance-tune/Zig, zig, zig on his violin....Through the gloom, white skeletons pass/Running and leaping in their shrouds....The bones of the dancers are heard to crack." Once the cock crows, signaling the approach of morning, the fun ends. It is possible that this is the first instance of Death being portrayed as a violinist, an instrument generally associated with the devil. performed by Marie-Claire Alain, at the Organ Marie-Claire Alain was the youngest child in a family of distinguished musicians, born August 10, 1926, in St. Germain-en Laye, a Paris suburb. Her father, Albert Alain, a composer and amateur organ builder, had been a pupil of Guilmant and Fauré. Her sister Odile was a promising soprano and pianist who lost her life early in a mountaineering accident; her older brother, Olivier, was a composer, pianist, and musicologist. Her oldest brother was the renowned Jehan Alain, a composer and organist whose teachers included Dupré, Dukas, and Jean Roger-Ducasse. He numbered Messiaen and Poulenc among his closest friends and his works for organ — Litanies, in particular — established him as one of the brightest stars among rising French composers in the decade before his battlefield death in 1940, at 29. A twin sense of loss and inheritance informed her studies and career. and the National Orchestra of the O.R.T.F. conducted by Jean Martinon In the words of one of his biographers, conductor Jean Martinon's performances "were distinguished by a concern for translucent orchestral textures, and sustained by a subtle sense of rhythm and phrasing." Occasionally, "he stressed a poetic inflection at the expense of literal accuracy." Martinon's first instrument was the violin; he studied at the Lyons Conservatory (1924-1925), then transferred to the Paris Conservatory, where he won first prize in violin upon his graduation in 1928. He subsequently studied composition, with Albert Roussel, and conducting, with Charles Munch and Roger Desormière. Until the outbreak of World War II, Martinon was primarily a composer. His early substantial works include a Symphoniette for piano, percussion, and strings (1935); Symphony No. 1 (1936); Concerto giocoso for violin and orchestra (1937); and a wind quintet (1938). At the start of the war he was drafted into the French army. Taken prisoner in 1940, he passed the next two years in a Nazi labor camp. There, he wrote Stalag IX (Musique d'exil), an orchestral piece incorporating elements of jazz; during his internment, he also composed several religious works, including Absolve, Domine for male chorus and orchestra, and Psalm 136 (Chant des captifs), the latter receiving a composition prize from the city of Paris in 1946.
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imageVintage LP Jean-philippe Rameau: Dardanus Orchestral Suite: Baroque Soloists: John Eliot Gardiner— $14.99 (Save 40%!)
Vinatge LP SLEEVE IS IN VERY GOOD CONDITION, LP IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION THE MUSICAL HERITAGE SOCIETY A DIGITAL RECORDING MHS 7102F RARE VINTAGE CLASSICAL OPERA JEAN-PHILIPPE RAMEAU Jean-Philippe Rameau was one of the truly multifaceted musicians of his day. Acclaimed for his innovative and popular operas, he was also known as one of...
Vinatge LP SLEEVE IS IN VERY GOOD CONDITION, LP IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION THE MUSICAL HERITAGE SOCIETY A DIGITAL RECORDING MHS 7102F RARE VINTAGE CLASSICAL OPERA JEAN-PHILIPPE RAMEAU Jean-Philippe Rameau was one of the truly multifaceted musicians of his day. Acclaimed for his innovative and popular operas, he was also known as one of the greatest organists in France, and his theoretical writings continue to influence musical thinkers over two centuries later. Although his father was a professional organist, Rameau was expected to pursue a career in the law. However, he was musically very precocious, teaching himself several instruments and the basics of harmony and composition. After spending more time on music than on his studies at the Jesuit College in Dijon (1693-1697), Rameau was removed from school; only when he was 18 did his parents give in to his wishes for a musical career. He went to Italy for a few months, and spent some time playing violin in a travelling French opera troupe. Then he took organist posts in Clermont-Ferrand (1702-1705), Paris (1705-1708), Dijon (1709-1714), Lyons (1714-1715), and Clermont again (1715-1722). Rameau had begun composing for the harpsichord, publishing his first book of keyboard works in 1706 (subsequent volumes appeared in 1724, 1728, and 1741). He had also written a few motets and secular cantatas, and had started his first book, the Traité de l'harmonie (published 1722), which later made his reputation as an important theorist. Hoping for greater fame as a composer, he moved to Paris in late 1722; there he took on some private students and composed numerous keyboard and short stage works. Eventually, he came to the attention of the financier and courtier Le Riche de la Pouplinière, who hired Rameau as conductor of his orchestra (a position he held for some 22 years) and allowed him and his family to live in his mansion. Through La Pouplinière, Rameau also met many of the great writers of his day, including some who later became librettists for his operas. Rameau produced his first opera, Hippolyte et Aricie (1733), at the age of 50. The work wasn't well received initially, but the opera Castor et Pollux (1737) was much more successful, and Rameau gradually became known as one of France's leading composers. For the rest of his life, he divided his time between composing and writing further theoretical works like Nouveau système de musique théorique (1726), Dissertation sur les differents méthodes d'accompagnement pour le clavecin ou pour l'orgue (1732), and Démonstration du principe de l'harmonie (1750). He felt his theoretical works were at least as important as his music, and defended his theories in extensive correspondences and debates with many of the leading musical thinkers in Europe. In 1745, he was appointed composer of the King's chamber music. He continued writing operas, both tragic works like Dardanus (1739, rev. 1744) and comedies like Platée (1745) and La Princesse de Navarre (1745). These and his other operas and incidental music (he wrote about 30 stage works in all) were noteworthy for their expanded harmonic palate, their brilliant choruses and ballets, and the prominent role Rameau gave to the orchestra. But not everyone admired his music, and for years a bitter public rivalry existed between the Rameau partisans and the "Lullistes," who preferred the somewhat more conservative works of Jean-Baptiste Lully. Rameau also had to defend his musical style in the "War of the Buffoons" of 1752 against those who preferred the lighter Italian operas of composers like Giovanni Battista Pergolesi. Four months before his death, Rameau was granted a patent of nobility by King Louis XV. He died just before his 81st birthday, and was buried at his parish church at St. Eustache. Dardanus Dardanus, tragédie en musique Orchestral Suite Jean-Philippe Rameau's Dardanus is typical of his works for the operatic stage: it contains innovative music of great inspiration and dramatic sensitivity, and it caused a public controversy at the time of its premiere. Rameau, who was a respected theorist and writer as well as a composer, employed harmonic devices, orchestrations, and a range of emotional expression that some listeners found grotesque, especially those who favored the works of his predecessors, Jean-Baptiste Lully. Lully's works were more typical of the period than were those of Rameau, especially in their relatively understated orchestrations and use of secco (dry) recitative — done with only keyboard accompaniment. For those who valued tradition over innovation, Rameau's work — full of dramatic instrumentation and accompanied recitatives (performed with orchestra) — was simply too adventuresome and, although Rameau's more forward-looking style would eventually win out, the conflict between the supporters of Rameau and Lully makes for one of opera history's more colorful chapters. Based on Greek mythology, the libretto, by Charles-Antoine Leclerc de La Bruère, tells the story of Jupiter's son, Dardanus, and his war with The king of Phrygia. Bruère's libretto represents opera seria at both its most grand and its most absurd: the numerous processions, dream scenes and intrigues brought out the best in Rameau's dramatic writing, but the plot was so laden with supernatural events and interventions that it became a caricature of itself. For this reason, Dardanus was a less-than-spectacular success at its premiere (Paris Opéra, November 1739), and underwent at least two extensive revisions, the first of which completely discarded the last three acts. Subsequent versions placed a greater emphasis on human relationships and simplified the plot — steps that were necessary for the sake of clarity and cohesion, but which also involved the removal of excellent music. Modern revivals of Dardanus have attempted to find an effective middle ground, keeping as much as possible of Rameau's colorful writing while trimming the plot into a coherent form — often with great success. and performed by the English Baroque Soloists Although the English Baroque Soloists was officially established as a chamber ensemble of period instruments in 1978, the group actually gave its first concert at the 1977 Innsbruck Festival of Early Music in a performance of Handel's Acis and Galatea. Founded by John Eliot Gardiner, the group regularly performs throughout England and Europe. It has given a number of concerts in two London halls, the Barbican and St. John's Smith Square. The English Baroque Soloists drew many of their original members from another group Gardiner had founded (in 1968), the Monteverdi Orchestra. and conducted by John Eliot Gardiner John Eliot Gardiner is one of the leading conductors in the active "authentic performances" movement in England, performing Baroque music but also extending his range into later repertoire. He first conducted at the age of 15, and after finishing school he studied at King's College, Cambridge. While still an undergraduate, he conducted the combined Oxford and Cambridge Singers on a 1964 tour of the Middle East and founded the Monteverdi Choir, which has consistently performed on his recordings since.
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imageMarian Anderson "Let Us Break Bread Together" and "Oh! What a Beautiful City" 78RPM 10" Porcelain— $14.99 (Save 50%!)
Vintage 78 RPM 10 inch Porcelain Record Traditional Spirituals sung by Marian Anderson Arrangement by William Lawrence sung by Marian Anderson - Contralto accompanied by Franz Rupp at Piano A legendary African-American interpreter of both operatic and concert repertoire, Marian Anderson was possessed of one of the finest contralto voices...
Vintage 78 RPM 10 inch Porcelain Record Traditional Spirituals sung by Marian Anderson Arrangement by William Lawrence sung by Marian Anderson - Contralto accompanied by Franz Rupp at Piano A legendary African-American interpreter of both operatic and concert repertoire, Marian Anderson was possessed of one of the finest contralto voices in living memory. Her career was notable not only for her artistic achievements -- which were many -- but also for a dignified tenacity in the face of discrimination. She opened doors for subsequent generations of black American singers. Having sung since childhood, and subsequently studied with a number of teachers in her native Philadelphia, Anderson first rose to prominence when she appeared with the New York Philharmonic Orchestra in 1925. In the early '30s she made a successful concert tour of Europe, and solidified her growing reputation with further appearances in New York and London. In 1939, Anderson scheduled an appearance at Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C., but was denied the use of the building by its owners, the Daughters of the American Revolution, who objected to the presentation of a black performer. Eleanor Roosevelt resigned her membership in the DAR in protest of this decision and then scheduled an appearance for Anderson at the Lincoln Memorial on Easter Sunday. The resulting concert, attended by thousands and broadcast nationwide, forever established Anderson as an ambassador for racial progress -- a role she embraced with great pride and success for the remainder of her career. Fittingly, Anderson's 1955 appearance at the Metropolitan Opera marked the first by an African-American singer, preparing the way for such future stars as Leontyne Price and Shirley Verrett. Marian Anderson's voice was dark, rich, and possessed of great power and agility. Her repertory ranged from opera and concert material to Negro spirituals, and she brought to all things a great sense of commitment and integrity. Arturo Toscanini is noted to have remarked that a voice like hers only appears "once in a hundred years." Her extraordinary range extended all the way down to the D below middle C -- as displayed in her performances of Schubert's song Death and the Maiden (Der Tod und das Mädchen) -- as well as upwards into soprano territory (as an exercise, she even sang the devastatingly difficult "Casta diva" from Bellini's Norma). While her voice was most distinctive in the lower range, she was also capable of lightening it almost to leggiero proportions -- as she did in works of Handel and other Baroque composers -- and of bringing a near-ideal combination of classical training and folk-like spontaneity to the spirituals that were an integral part of her concert and recording repertoire.
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imageVintage LP - Saint-Saens Symphony No. 3 in C Minor, (Organ Symphony)— $14.99 (Save 40%!)
RARE VINTAGE CLASSICAL SYMPHONIC ORGAN CONCERTO ANGEL RECORDS 35336 SLEEVE IS IN GOOD CONDITION - LP IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION Composed by CAMILLE SAINT-SAENS Camille Saint-Saëns was something of an anomaly among French composers of the nineteenth century in that he wrote in virtually all genres, including opera, symphonies,...
RARE VINTAGE CLASSICAL SYMPHONIC ORGAN CONCERTO ANGEL RECORDS 35336 SLEEVE IS IN GOOD CONDITION - LP IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION Composed by CAMILLE SAINT-SAENS Camille Saint-Saëns was something of an anomaly among French composers of the nineteenth century in that he wrote in virtually all genres, including opera, symphonies, concertos, songs, sacred and secular choral music, solo piano, and chamber music. He was generally not a pioneer, though he did help to revive some earlier and largely forgotten dance forms, like the bourée and gavotte. He was a conservative who wrote many popular scores scattered throughout the various genres: the Piano Concerto No. 2, Symphony No. 3 ("Organ"), the symphonic poem Danse macabre, the opera Samson et Dalila, and probably his most widely performed work, The Carnival of The Animals. While he remained a composer closely tied to tradition and traditional forms in his later years, he did develop a more arid style, less colorful and, in the end, less appealing. He was also a poet and playwright of some distinction. Saint-Saëns was born in Paris on October 9, 1835. He was one of the most precocious musicians ever, beginning piano lessons with his aunt at two-and-a-half and composing his first work at three. At age seven he studied composition with Pierre Maledin. When he was ten, he gave a concert that included Beethoven's Third Piano Concerto, Mozart's B flat Concerto, K. 460, along with works by Bach, Handel, and Hummel. In his academic studies, he displayed the same genius, learning languages and advanced mathematics with ease and celerity. He would also develop keen, lifelong interests in geology and astronomy. In 1848, he entered the Paris Conservatory and studied organ and composition, the latter with Halévy. By his early twenties, following the composition of two symphonies, he had won the admiration and support of Berlioz, Liszt, Gounod, Rossini, and other notable figures. From 1853 to 1876, he held church organist posts; he also taught at the École Niedermeyer (1861-1865). He composed much throughout his early years, turning out the 1853 Symphony in F ("Urbs Roma"), a Mass (1855) and several concertos, including the popular second, for piano (1868). In 1875, Saint-Saëns married the 19-year-old Marie Truffot, bringing on perhaps the saddest chapter in his life. The union produced two children who died within six weeks of each other, one from a four-story fall. The marriage ended in 1881. Oddly, this dark period in his life produced some of his most popular works, including Danse macabre (1875) and Samson et Dalila (1878). After the tragic events of his marriage, Saint-Saëns developed a fondness for Fauré and his family, acting as a second father to Fauré's children. But he also remained very close to his mother, who had opposed his marriage. When she died in 1888, the composer fell into a deep depression, even contemplating suicide for a time. He did much travel in the years that followed and developed an interest in Algeria and Egypt, which eventually inspired him to write Africa (1891) and his Piano Concerto No. 5, the "Egyptian". He also turned out works unrelated to exotic places, such as his popular and most enduring serious composition, the Symphony No. 3. Curiously, after 1890, Saint-Saëns' music was regarded with some condescension in his homeland, while in England and the United States he was hailed as France's greatest living composer well into the twentieth century. Saint-Saëns experienced an especially triumphant concert tour when he visited the U.S. in 1915. In the last two decades of his life, he remained attached to his dogs and was largely a loner. He died in Algeria on December 16, 1921. selection SYMPHONY No. 3 in C Minor ("Organ"), Op. 78 The London Philharmonic Society commissioned the Symphony No. 3 from Saint-Saëns, much as it had Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. Saint-Saëns directed the first performance in London on May 19, 1886. Although he lived until 1921, Saint-Saëns would not compose another symphony. He later explained: "With it I have given all I could give. What I did I could not achieve again." He had intended to dedicate the piece to Liszt, but the score was published after Liszt's death with the inscription, "Á la Memoire de Franz Liszt." The Symphony in C minor shows Saint-Saëns' use of thematic transformation, also present in the overture Spartacus and the Fourth Piano Concerto. This technique Saint-Saëns observed in the symphonic poems of Liszt, as well as in Berlioz's Symphonie fantastique. Following their lead, Saint-Saëns takes his principal theme through transformations throughout his Third Symphony. To the typical forces of a large orchestra he added his and Liszt's primary instruments, the organ and piano. Saint-Saëns cast the symphony in two large sections, but each of these is in two clear parts, creating a traditional four-movement work. After an Adagio introduction, the tempo shifts to Allegro moderato and the strings perform the main theme of the first movement, which incorporates the chant at the beginning of the Dies irae, a melody associated with both death and, in part because of the Totentanz, Liszt. The melody exhibits an AABB pattern, which is typical of the composer's works, and is the main idea, or "motto" theme, of the entire symphony. This restless theme is transformed and eventually gives way to a new, calmer idea. Afterward, these two themes appear simultaneously in the development section before a return brings more transformational episodes and prepares for the slow "movement," in D flat major. Strings, supported by organ chords, perform the main theme of the second movement, Adagio, which is the best known section of the Third Symphony. Woodwinds take the peaceful theme and vary it until a new transformation of the "motto" theme injects contrasting, restless energy. A return of the Adagio theme rounds off the movement. Near the end we hear a brilliant mixture of woodwinds with reed stops on the organ. An aggressive, brief theme opens the Scherzo, a transformation of the motto contained in the low string outburst that follows the first phrase. When the tempo changes to Presto, the piano enters with rapid, rising arpeggios and scales, played several times on different harmonies. The Scherzo material returns, and what seems like a reprise of the Presto section introduces a new theme, played by the lower instruments under busy figurations and anticipating the finale. The finale opens with a powerful chord played on the organ. Yet another transformation of the "motto" theme appears; this time its ties with the Dies irae are very clear. A few quiet statements follow before the organ and orchestra join in a powerful presentation of the transformed theme. After a development section, the piece closes with all the available forces in C major. performed by Henriette Roget, Organ and the Orchestre de la Societe des Concerts du Conservatoire conducted by Andre Cluytens André Cluytens was among the leading French conductors of his time. His father, Alphonse Cluytens, was also a conductor, and recognized the boy's musical talents. André was enrolled in the Royal Flemish Conservatory at the age of nine. He studied in the piano class of Emile Bosquet, and received first prize for piano at the age of 16. The next year he won first prize in harmony, theory, counterpoint, and fugue. His father was conductor at the Royal French Theater of Antwerp. André became his assistant and a choirmaster there. When an illness prevented Alphonse from conducting, André made his performance debut in 1927 in Bizet's Les Pêcheurs de perles. After that experience he devoted his efforts to orchestral and opera conducting rather than choral work, and he became a resident conductor in the house.
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imageVintage LP Albert Roussel "Bacchus Et Ariane" Two Suites for Orchestra— $14.99 (Save 40%!)
RARE VINTAGE CLASSICAL SYMPHONIC BALLET IN TWO ACTS THE MUSICAL HERITAGE SOCIETY STEREO MHS 1244 SLEEVE IS IN GOOD CONDITION - LP IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION composed by ALBERT ROUSSEL Though less well known than his contemporaries Ravel and Debussy, Albert Roussel is nevertheless regarded as one of the most important figures in early...
RARE VINTAGE CLASSICAL SYMPHONIC BALLET IN TWO ACTS THE MUSICAL HERITAGE SOCIETY STEREO MHS 1244 SLEEVE IS IN GOOD CONDITION - LP IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION composed by ALBERT ROUSSEL Though less well known than his contemporaries Ravel and Debussy, Albert Roussel is nevertheless regarded as one of the most important figures in early twentieth century French music. Roussel's music reflects his efforts to explore new possibilities of expression while remaining faithful to traditional musical ideas; evident in his chamber music and works for the stage, this tension between traditionalism and experimentation is particularly successful in his symphonies. Born into an affluent family, Roussel lost both his parents when he was very young, and was entrusted to the care of his grandfather at age seven; in 1880, the grandfather died, and a maternal aunt took over the responsibility of raising the boy. Although he was interested in music, Roussel decided to pursue a naval career; he graduated from the Ecole Navale in 1889, eventually serving in Indochina as an officer. In 1894, however, Roussel resigned his commission, devoting himself completely to music. He went to Paris, where he studied with the composer and organist Eugene Gigout. Four years later, he began studies with Vincent d'Indy at the newly-founded Schola Cantorum. In 1902, although he had not yet completed his studies, Roussel became professor of counterpoint at the Schola Cantorum. Having already composed several significant works (including his Piano Trio and the First Symphony), Roussel married Blanche Preisach in 1908; the following year, the two traveled to India, where he was exposed to the medieval Hindu legend of Queen Padmavati, who sacrificed her life for love. Fascinated by this story, Roussel decided to set it to music (his opera, Padmåvatî, 1923). At the outbreak of World War I in 1914 Roussel applied for active duty, eventually obtaining an artillery commission; after the war, having retired to Perros-Guirec on the coast of Brittany, he focused on unfinished projects, which included the opera-ballet Padmåvatî. This work, which incorporates elements of traditional Indian music, marked a new period for Roussel, whose earlier compositions showed influences of Impressionism. During the 1920s, Roussel struggled to balance an increasing structural complexity with emotional expressiveness in his works. His Second Symphony, completed in 1921, exemplifies this tension; in Roussel's subsequent works, the listener can also detect elements of neo-Classicism. In 1922, Roussel settled in Vasterival, in the coast of Normandy. Despite increasingly frail health, he devoted much of his energy to composing; he completed the Piano Concerto in 1927. His increasing public esteem is evidenced by a festival entirely devoted to his works in Paris (1927) as well as a commission from the Boston Symphony Orchestra for that organization's 50th anniversary (Third Symphony, 1930); Roussel traveled to the United States for the performance. Works composed toward the end of Roussel's life, such as the String Quartet (1931-1932), the Fourth Symphony (1934), and the String Trio (1937), show his melodic idiom to be enriched by elements of chromaticism and polytonality. In these compositions, Roussel managed a successful synthesis of these new elements with the transparency of his earlier style. Bacchus et Ariane, ballet, Op. 43 Receiving its premiere in a lavish production at the Paris Opéra on May 22, 1931, — with Olga Spessiwtsewa dancing Ariane, Serge Peretti as Theseus, and choreography by Serge Lifar, who danced Bacchus — Bacchus et Ariane met a cool reception and venomous criticism of the set and costumes by Giorgio di Chirico. The flop was remarkable, for, taken with his Third Symphony, Bacchus et Ariane is the glowing summit of Roussel's symphonic art. Partitioned into suites, the ballet's two acts have won success in the concert hall, beginning with performances led by Charles Munch in 1933 and by Pierre Monteux in 1934. Taking up music as a career in his mid-twenties, in a time of unparalleled diversity and experimentation, Roussel was keenly aware of style. A prolonged flirtation with the sensuous world of Impressionism stimulated his first symphonic masterpieces — the Symphony No. 1 ("Le Poème de la forêt" [1906]) and the glowing Evocations (1910). With Evocations, and his marriage to Blanche Preisach followed by an extended honeymoon in India and Cambodia, a strain of exoticism colored his work, culminating in the great opera-ballet, Padmâvatî (1914/18). The "hermetic" Second Symphony (the composer's description [1919/21]) marks a stylistic shake-out, a turn toward purely musical processes, and a new — non-programmatic, non-descriptive — linear classicism realized in the works of the 1920s, and preeminently in the condensed, powerful utterance of the Third Symphony (1929/30). Thus, when offered Abel Hermant's scenario for Bacchus et Ariane, Roussel took it with the serenity of a master raconteur who knows how to marshal his effects — and who has considerable effects to marshal — lavishing them upon this ancient fable which has fired the imaginations of musicians through the ages. From the opening propulsive bound, celebrating Theseus' slaying of the Minotaur, the listener is transported by a unique rhythmic vivacity of strongly accented, often enticingly irregular, and arrestingly shifting meters. For Roussel, the Dionysian is not (as it was for, say, Szymanowski) primarily intoxicating and erotic — Bacchus is a god of enchantments and compelling dynamism. And Ariane never fails to draw from him music of sinuous tenderness. Throughout, the score is rife with glowing melody and preternatural animation, couched in orchestral writing ranging from caressing sorcery to coruscating brilliance. The music rises to each moment — Ariane's salto mortale, Bacchus' kiss and spell, the procession of Bacchic worshippers, and so on — with richly compact, spellbinding invention. And it must be said that the final Bacchanale and coronation of Ariane ranks among the most powerfully whelming endings in French music of any genre. performed by the NATIONAL ORCHESTRA of the O.R.T.F. conducted by JEAN MARTINON In the words of one of his biographers, conductor Jean Martinon's performances "were distinguished by a concern for translucent orchestral textures, and sustained by a subtle sense of rhythm and phrasing." Occasionally, "he stressed a poetic inflection at the expense of literal accuracy." Martinon's first instrument was the violin; he studied at the Lyons Conservatory (1924-1925), then transferred to the Paris Conservatory, where he won first prize in violin upon his graduation in 1928. He subsequently studied composition, with Albert Roussel, and conducting, with Charles Munch and Roger Desormière. Until the outbreak of World War II, Martinon was primarily a composer. His early substantial works include a Symphoniette for piano, percussion, and strings (1935); Symphony No. 1 (1936); Concerto giocoso for violin and orchestra (1937); and a wind quintet (1938). At the start of the war he was drafted into the French army. Taken prisoner in 1940, he passed the next two years in a Nazi labor camp. There, he wrote Stalag IX (Musique d'exil), an orchestral piece incorporating elements of jazz; during his internment, he also composed several religious works, including Absolve, Domine for male chorus and orchestra, and Psalm 136 (Chant des captifs), the latter receiving a composition prize from the city of Paris in 1946. Upon his release from the Nazi camp, Martinon became conductor of the Bordeaux Symphony Orchestra (from 1943 to 1945) and assistant conductor of the Paris Conservatory Orchestra (from 1944 to 1946), then associate conductor of the London Philharmonic (from 1947 to 1949). He toured as a guest conductor as well, although his U.S. debut did not come until 1957, with the Boston Symphony giving the American premiere of his Symphony No. 2. Although he devoted as much time as he could to composing in the early postwar years — producing a string quartet (1946), an "Irish" Symphony (1948), the ballet Ambohimanga (1946), and the opera Hécube (1949-1954) — he was increasingly occupied with conducting, working with the Concerts Lamoureux (from 1951 to 1957), the Israel Philharmonic (from 1957 to 1959), and Düsseldorf Symphony Orchestra (from 1960 to 1966). In 1963, he succeeded Fritz Reiner as head of the Chicago Symphony. Martinon's tenure there was difficult. In five seasons, he conducted 60 works by modern European and American composers, and made a number of outstanding LPs for RCA, mostly of bracing twentieth century repertory in audiophile sound. Chicago's conservative music lovers soon sent him packing.
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imageVinatge LP - Dvorak's Piano Concerto with Michael Ponti & Rohan— $14.99 (Save 40%!)
TURNABOUT RECORDS TV-S 34539 SLEEVE IS IN GOOD CONDITION - LP IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION RARE VINTAGE CLASSICAL WORK FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA FROM ANTONIN DVORAK Widely regarded as the most distinguished of Czech composers, Antonin Dvorák (1841-1904) produced attractive and vigorous music possessed of clear formal outlines, melodies...
TURNABOUT RECORDS TV-S 34539 SLEEVE IS IN GOOD CONDITION - LP IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION RARE VINTAGE CLASSICAL WORK FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA FROM ANTONIN DVORAK Widely regarded as the most distinguished of Czech composers, Antonin Dvorák (1841-1904) produced attractive and vigorous music possessed of clear formal outlines, melodies that are both memorable and spontaneous-sounding, and a colorful, effective instrumental sense. Dvorák is considered one of the major figures of nationalism, both proselytizing for and making actual use of folk influences, which he expertly combined with Classical forms in works of all genres. His symphonies are among his most widely appreciated works; the Symphony No. 9 ("From the New World," 1893) takes a place among the finest and most popular examples of the symphonic literature. Similarly, his Cello Concerto (1894-1895) is one of the cornerstones of the repertory, providing the soloist an opportunity for virtuosic flair and soaring expressivity. Dvorák displayed special skill in writing for chamber ensembles, producing dozens of such works; among these, his 14 string quartets (1862-1895), the "American" Quintet (1893) and the "Dumky" Trio (1890-1891) are outstanding examples of their respective genres, overflowing with attractive folklike melodies set like jewels into the solid fixtures of Brahmsian absolute forms. Dvorák's "American" and "New World" works arose during the composer's sojourn in the United States in the early 1890s; he was uneasy with American high society and retreated to a small, predominantly Czech town in Iowa for summer vacations during his stay. However, he did make the acquaintance of the pioneering African-American baritone H.T. Burleigh, who may have influenced the seemingly spiritual-like melodies in the "New World" symphony and other works; some claim that the similarity resulted instead from a natural affinity between African-American and Eastern European melodic structures. By that time, Dvorák was among the most celebrated of European composers, seen by many as the heir to Brahms, who had championed Dvorák during the younger composer's long climb to the top. The son of a butcher and occasional zither player, Dvorák studied the organ in Prague as a young man and worked variously as a café violist and church organist during the 1860s and 1870s while creating a growing body of symphonies, chamber music, and Czech-language opera. For three years in the 1870s he won a government grant (the Viennese critic Hanslick was among the judges) designed to help the careers of struggling young creative artists. Brahms gained for Dvorák a contract with his own publisher, Simrock, in 1877; the association proved a profitable one despite an initial controversy that flared when Dvorák insisted on including Czech-language work titles on the printed covers, a novelty in those musically German-dominated times. In the 1880s and 1890s Dvorák's reputation became international in scope thanks to a series of major masterpieces that included the Seventh, Eighth, and "New World" symphonies. At the end of his life he turned to opera once again; Rusalka, from 1901, incorporates Wagnerian influences into the musical telling of its legend-based story, and remains the most frequently performed of the composer's vocal works. Dvorák, a professor at Prague University from 1891 on, exerted a deep influence on Czech music of the twentieth century; among his students was Josef Suk, who also became his son-in-law. Featuring Piano Concerto in G Minor, B. 63, Op. 33 Antonín Dvorák composed his only virtuoso vehicle for pianoforte and orchestra during the late summer months of 1876, at the prompting of a notable Czech pianist. The Piano Concerto in G minor, Op. 33, is often described as Dvorák's first effort at concerto composition, but in fact this is not so: he had, a dozen or so years earlier, made what might be called a first draft of a concerto for cello and orchestra — an apprentice piece that quite naturally pales when placed next to his mature cello concerto of 1894-1895. It is usually, but certainly not always accurately, assumed that a pianoforte concerto is a vehicle for better and loftier musical thoughts than is a concerto for string instruments (the assumption goes back to Mozart and Beethoven, for whom it does indeed hold true), and Dvorák — himself far more a string player than a pianist — seems to have approached his Piano Concerto with that assumption in mind. The work is epic in style, grand in architecture, and sewn from an immediately and urgently dramatic fabric very different in kind from that used for the Violin Concerto, Op. 53, of just a few years later. Even Dvorák devotees, however, are forced to admit that the Piano Concerto is not a completely successful piece of music. Some of the problems come from the piano writing, which is at times imbalanced and unwieldy. Many pianists have edited and rewritten the pianoforte part of the concerto over the years, but, in the end, something is lost in these rewrites. It takes a superb pianist to pull off Dvorák's original, but it can be done: Sviatoslav Richter is perhaps the finest exponent the work has yet known. There is a full orchestral exposition at the start of the Allegro agitato first movement (again unlike the Violin Concerto, in which the soloist intrudes after just a few bars). The principal theme is symphonic in tone; the second theme veers towards something very chorale-like. A bombastic cadenza is the only sure sign that the work is not really a symphony accidentally scored for piano and orchestra. The Andante sostenuto in D major is serene, and follows a harmonic path full of quiet surprises. The Allegro con brio finale is started by the soloist, a vintage Beethoven move, and proceeds to romp around in vintage Dvorák style; there is an undisguised Bohemianism to the energetic principal ideas of this rondo. performed by Michael Ponti Micheal Ponti is an all-around pianist who has recorded a wide variety of literature ranging from the early Romantics to that of Pierre Boulez. He began recording in the 1950s for Period and is best-known for his series of recordings The Romantic Piano Concerto issued by VoxBox. However, Ponti has always maintained a number of different label associations and is yet actively recording in the year 2001. and the Prague Symphony Orchestra conducted by Jindrich Rohan
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